The Imaging Papyri Project

University of Oxford
University of Oxford (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Oxford University Classics Faculty’s PINAX “is a digital library comprised of collections of displayed papyrus images and texts at Oxford.” Texts include papyri from Antinoopolis, Herculaneum, and Oxyrhynchus, as well as magical texts (HT: Charles Jones).

Cologne Court Circumscribes Circumcision

ABC News (HT: Michael Bird) and the AFP (HT: Jim Davila) are reporting that the regional court in Cologne, Germany, has rendered a verdict that makes involuntary circumcision on religious grounds illegal, although the practice remains permissible if done for medical reasons. The decision follows on the treatment of a four-year-old Muslim boy for post-operative bleeding and the prosecution of the doctor who had performed the procedure.

Jim Davila comments that “banning circumcision didn’t work out very well for Antiochus Epiphanes.” In addition, the court commented that:

The body of the child is irreparably and permanently changed by a circumcision. . . . This change contravenes the interests of the child to decide later on his religious beliefs. (via AFP)

Here, 1 Macc 1:10–15 is also an interesting counterpoint. One wonders too, whether, the language of the court’s decision might not be logically extensible to things like infant ear piercings.

Congratulations, Dr. Copenhaver!

Via Michael Bird:

I’m glad to announce that my Ph.D padwan Adam Copenhaver has passed his doctoral viva. His thesis was: “The Colossian Heresy? An Investigation of the Christological Polemics and Socio-Cultural Background in Colossians.” Adam boldly argued for M.D. Hooker’s position that there was no specific “heresy” or “heretics” in Colossae, and Colossians was written as a general exhortation against a variety of possible religious encroachments against a cluster of house churches in the interior of the Lycus Valley.

Adam is a cohort from Westminster. We’ve kept in touch a bit since then, and it’s a delight to see that his thesis’s passage is now official.

On the Web (June 13, 2012)

On the web:

  • Stephen Carlson’s dissertation on Galatians’ textual history is now available online in PDF format.
  • Joel Willitts ponders “what to do with the story of Israel.”
  • Tony Peterson reviews the recent Tokens show at Lipscomb University that featured Miroslav Volf, Saeed Khan, and Fred Gray, among a number of musicians.
  • Brian LePort considers Everett Ferguson’s discussion of Tertullian.
  • Joseph Kelly reviews some recent discussion of the referent(s) of “Torah” when used in the Hebrew Bible.

Academic Stimulants?

Image representing New York Times as depicted ...
Image via CrunchBase

Sunday’s New York Times had a disquieting article about a potentially dramatic increase in substance abuse among teens for the sake of improved academic performance:

The boy exhaled. Before opening the car door, he recalled recently, he twisted open a capsule of orange powder and arranged it in a neat line on the armrest. He leaned over, closed one nostril and snorted it.

Throughout the parking lot, he said, eight of his friends did the same thing.

The drug was not cocaine or heroin, but Adderall, an amphetamine prescribed for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder that the boy said he and his friends routinely shared to study late into the night, focus during tests and ultimately get the grades worthy of their prestigious high school in an affluent suburb of New York City. The drug did more than just jolt them awake for the 8 a.m. SAT; it gave them a tunnel focus tailor-made for the marathon of tests long known to make or break college applications.

“Everyone in school either has a prescription or has a friend who does,” the boy said.

For the full article, see here.

On the Web (June 7, 2012)

On the Web:

On the Web (June 5, 2012)

On the web: