Dawson on Acts and Jubilees

In the Journal of Greco-Roman Christianity and Judaism, Zachary Dawson discusses “The Books of Acts and Jubilees in Dialogue: A Literary-Intertextual Analysis of the Noahide Laws in Acts 15 and 21.” As Dawson summarizes,

This study has … identified two main elements of the theme that is symbolically articulated by the Noahide laws. First, the purpose of the Noahide laws in Acts is to oppose a contemporary Jewish isolationism that is rationalized by the Noahide laws, and more generally in their contexts of the rewritten, conditional Noahic covenant. Instead, the precepts in Acts ally with the purpose Cohen identifies in the later rabbinic literature, a means to recognize the legitimacy of different cultures and to facilitate their integration. Second, the Noahide laws in Acts carry the message that Gentiles are to honor certain Jewish customs so that Jews will not be forced out of believing communities.

For Dawson’s full essay, see the JGRChJ website.

Citing Lexica per SBLHS2

The SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., contains fairly sparse treatment of how to cite lexicographic sources (§6.3.7), and none of the provided examples address how to cite standard lexica for the biblical languages (e.g., BDAG, HALOT). This clarification is supplied in a post on the handbook’s blog. Footnoted citations should follow a form like:

BDAG, s.v. [entry]

HALOT, s.v. [entry]

The lexicon abbreviation is italicized or not depending on whether it abbreviates the lexicon’s title or the initials of the parties responsible for the work.

For additional examples, information, and discussion, please see the full post on the SBL Handbook of Style blog.

Wasserman and Gurry on the CBGM

Tommy Wasserman and Peter Gurry have a new introduction to the Coherence-Based Genealogical Method (CBGM) due out this month. According to the book’s blurb,

With the publication of the widely used twenty-eighth edition of Nestle-Aland’s Novum Testamentum Graece and the fifth edition of the United Bible Society Greek New Testament, a computer-assisted method known as the Coherence-Based Genealogical Method (CBGM) was used for the first time to determine the most valuable witnesses and establish the initial text. This book offers the first full-length, student-friendly introduction to this important new method. After setting out the method’s history, separate chapters clarify its key concepts such as genealogical coherence, textual flow diagrams, and the global stemma. Examples from across the New Testament are used to show how the method works in practice. The result is an essential introduction that will be of interest to students, translators, commentators, and anyone else who studies the Greek New Testament.

For more information, see the Evangelical Textual Criticism blog. To order, see the SBL website, Amazon, or other booksellers.

 

Bartholomew on “What the World Needs from Christian Academics”

Faithlife Today has posted a clip that mostly contains an interview with Craig Bartholomew about “what the world needs from Christian academics.” The post is dated 11 October 2017, but interview seems to have been recorded some time ago, before Bartholomew’s move to the Kirby Lang Institute and seemingly also before the publication of his introduction to hermeneutics. Even so, the content of the interview remains quite a poignant challenge.

Walton, “Old Testament Theology for Christians”

Walton, "Old Testament Theology for Christians" coverDue out next month from InterVarsity Press is John Walton’s Old Testament Theology for Christians: From Ancient Context to Enduring Belief. According to the book’s blub,

Walton unfolds a grand panorama of Yahweh and the gods, of cosmos and humanity, of covenant and kingdom, of temple and torah, of sin and evil, and of salvation and afterlife. Viewed within its ancient Near Eastern cognitive environment, the text takes unexpected turns and blossoms into fresh and challenging insights. No matter how you are accustomed to viewing the first testament of the Bible, Old Testament Theology for Christians will challenge and sharpen your perceptions.

For additional information or to pre-order, see InterVarsity, Amazon, or other book sellers.

Tyndale GNT to Be Available for Free

Forthcoming from Crossway this November is the new Greek New Testament edition produced by Tyndale House. Print copies are currently available for pre-order at Crossway, Amazon, and elsewhere. Per the FAQs sheet on the text as well,

This text will be available digitally and will be free for many uses around the world, in accord with the joint desire of both Tyndale House and Crossway to serve the global church in an open-handed way with the very best Greek text possible.

For other discussion of the Tyndale edition, see Tyndale House GNT and TNT Updates.

Speeding up Logos on Windows

Recent updates to Logos Bible Software for Windows have included an additional feature to speed up the platform’s load time. Users with hard disk (rather than solid-state) drives will notice the biggest improvements. For the present, the feature requires a manual action after each software update, but there are plans to roll this action into the update process in the future to eliminate the additional step.

Instructions and details can be found in this forum thread. On a suggestion that I came across in one of the forums, I’ve created a batch file and then linked to that file from the Logos bookmarks bar to simplify reapplying the enhancement. So, in the batch file, I have:

“[%Path to Logos.exe%]\Logos.exe” /ngen
rem “[%Path to Logos.exe%]\Logos.exe” /unngen

The second line does nothing since it’s currently a remark (“rem”). But, moving the “rem” notation from the second line to the first line and then rerunning the batch file would remove the enhancement if ever that were needed.

Anchor Bible Discounts from Logos

This month, three Anchor Bible volumes are free or deeply discounted from Logos Bible software:

The Anchor Bible series is itself also on sale for 50% off. For those interested in purchasing the series, it seems the recommended method is to take advantage of the individual volume discounts for this month and then let dynamic pricing apply to the balance of the series in a separate order.

Scott, “Exile: A Conversation with N. T. Wright”

Scott, "Exile" coverThis summer,  InterVarsity Press released James M. Scott’s Exile: A Conversation with N. T. Wright. According to the book’s blub, Wright’s

signature contention, that Israel’s continuing exile was a pivotal issue in the emergence of Christianity, has found a central place in contemporary New Testament scholarship.

While many find this a compelling key to understanding the New Testament, critical responses also abound. This book engages a variety of scholars in conversation with Wright’s thesis. The scene is set in an introduction by James M. Scott, who has made significant contributions to the debate. Then, in a programmatic essay, Wright clearly restates his thesis. Next come eleven essays from scholars such as Walter Brueggemann, Philip Alexander, Jörn Kiefer, Dorothy Peters, and Scot McKnight. They interact with Wright’s thesis from various perspectives: Hebrew Bible, Septuagint, early Judaism, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the New Testament. Hans Boersma and Ephraim Radner then engage Wright’s thesis from theological perspectives. Finally, Wright offers a lively response to his interlocutors.

For additional information or to pre-order, see InterVarsity, Amazon, or other book sellers.