Codex Marchalianus

The Vatican Library has made available a digital facsimile of Codex Marchalianus (7th–8th c.). The codex contains some prefatory material and the text of the prophets, including Baruch and the Letter of Jeremiah. Each page has two scans with alternate lighting. Below is a sample of the marginalia from Isa 25:8 (leaf 231) that notes the alternate readings for the passage in Theodotion (top) and Aquila (bottom).

Codex Marchalianus marginalia at Isa 25:8

It is (proto-)Theodotion’s reading that Paul reflects in 1 Cor 15:54. On this passage, see also the recent survey by John Meade.

Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on the Twelve Prophets

Cyril of Alexandria.jpg
Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

Cyril of Alexandria (d. 444) probably wrote his Commentary on the Twelve Prophets sometime before 428 (ODCC, s.v. “Cyril, St”; Robert C. Hill, trans., Cyril of Alexandria: Commentary on the Twelve, 1:4). The commentary is available in J.-P. Migne’s Patrologia Graeca via Documenta Catholica Omnia:

The two-volume critical edition of Philip Pusey (Clarendon, 1868) is also available via Google Books:

Field’s Edition of Origen’s Hexapla

Since 1875, Frederick Field’s edition of Origen’s Hexapla has been the standard reference for the work. A new edition is in preparation under the auspices of the Hexapla Project. But, for the present, Field’s work remains an invaluable resource. His two-volume edition is available via Internet Archive.

N.B.: The Internet Archive link in the Hexapla Project’s “Editions of the Hexaplaric Fragments” goes only to a page that provides only Field’s first volume, containing Genesis–Esther. The second volume, containing Job–Malachi, is available on a separate page.

Citing NPNF in SBL Style

According to the SBL Handbook of Style blog, the example given for citing NPNF in the SBL Handbook of Style’s second edition (pg. 101) is inconsistent:

Contra the example given in SBLHS, the series number is best indicated by a 1 or 2 plus a solidus preceding the volume number (not a superscripted 1 or 2). Thus volume 12 of the second series would be cited as follows:

NPNF 2/12:85–96

For additional discussion of SBL style, see SBLHS’s original post, as well as these related posts.

Old Latin Editions

A major critical edition of the Old Latin is underway under the auspices of the Vetus Latina Institute. Some volumes have already been released. But, others are still forthcoming.

Meanwhile, the only complete edition of the Old Latin remains that published by Pierre Sabatier (Reims: 1739–1749; see Würthwein, Text of the Old Testament, 147). A later version of this edition, with some volumes reissued in later years, seems to have had three volumes, all of which are available on Internet Archive:

Of course, if there are additional volumes that I have missed, comments identifying those volumes and links to them (if they have been made available online) are most welcome.

SBLHS2 and Ibid.

With the release of the Chicago Manual of Style‘s 17th edition, the SBL handbook began deferring to this edition (rather than the 16th) for matters not explicitly addressed in the SBL Handbook‘s 2nd edition or on the SBLHS blog.

One of the changes with CMS17 is eliminating the use of “ibid.” In keeping with CMS17, SBLHS also now eliminates “ibid.” But, SBLHS does have a slightly different convention for how to format notes where “ibid.” would have appeared (i.e., a short tile is always included).

For further discussion, see the SBLHS blog and The Chicago and SBL Manuals.

Codex Sarravianus Online

Internet Archive has a full-text PDF of Codex Sarravianus, a 5th-century majuscule witness to the Septuagint. The text contains A. W. Sijthoff’s 1897 photographic reproduction of the manuscript.

For reader’s convenience, the bottom of each page indicates the portion of the biblical text covered in that page’s facsimile, with hand-written notes over the facsimiles to indicate the starts of chapters.

The quality of the scan seems to be quite good. Below is an excerpt from Deut 30:2 (on pg. 248) showing the asterisks and metobelus used to mark what seems to be a revision toward the text represented in the MT.