Field’s Edition of Origen’s Hexapla

Since 1875, Frederick Field’s edition of Origen’s Hexapla has been the standard reference for the work. A new edition is in preparation under the auspices of the Hexapla Project. But, for the present, Field’s work remains an invaluable resource. His two-volume edition is available via Internet Archive.

N.B.: The Internet Archive link in the Hexapla Project’s “Editions of the Hexaplaric Fragments” goes only to a page that provides only Field’s first volume, containing Genesis–Esther. The second volume, containing Job–Malachi, is available on a separate page.

Codex Sarravianus Online

Internet Archive has a full-text PDF of Codex Sarravianus, a 5th-century majuscule witness to the Septuagint. The text contains A. W. Sijthoff’s 1897 photographic reproduction of the manuscript.

For reader’s convenience, the bottom of each page indicates the portion of the biblical text covered in that page’s facsimile, with hand-written notes over the facsimiles to indicate the starts of chapters.

The quality of the scan seems to be quite good. Below is an excerpt from Deut 30:2 (on pg. 248) showing the asterisks and metobelus used to mark what seems to be a revision toward the text represented in the MT.

Logos 7 academic basic

Logos Bible Software logoIn addition to Logos 7 basic, Logos 7 academic basic is available for free. Resources included in the package are sufficient to get one’s feet wet with the principles of how research in and with biblical languages work in Logos—namely:

Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew lexicon
Lexham Bible Dictionary
Septuagint (Lexham English and Swete Greek editions)
Lexham Hebrew Bible
Greek New Testament (SBL)
Lexham Textual Notes
Abbot-Smith Greek Lexicon

For additional information about Logos 7 academic basic, see the LogosTalk blog. To download the package, see the Logos website. For other discussion, see also Logos 7 Basic for free and Trial versions of Biblical Studies software.

Creating series in Logos

Logos Bible Software logoUnder the heading of “keeping your Greek and Hebrew skills sharp,” Mark Ward has some helpful advice about creating a serial biblical text in Logos Bible Software. For instance, if you create a series between BHS and NA28 and you have BHS open, you can type a New Testament passage in the go box and run straight there. Logos will treat the two resources as combined.

I’d had this done at one point, but then a subsequent software update disrupted that connection, and I’d been looking for a good way to reestablish the connection. Using Mark’s principles, I’ve now got serial relationships established among BHS, LXX (based on the current German Bible Society version of Rahlfs), and NA28 texts. The combination allows movement from any one of the texts to any other. For texts occurring in more than one of the resources (BHS, LXX), it looks like Logos may follow the priority system established via the library.

For the moment, the serial relationships don’t seem to get passed from the desktop version to iOS. But, one can hope that’s on the road-map for a future iOS app update.

Larger Cambridge Septuagint Online

The Larger Cambridge Septuagint project, The Old Testament in Greek according to the Text of Codex Vaticanus, had 9 fascicles published from 1909 to 1940. These fascicles are available in full-text PDFs via Internet Archive:

Although the Larger Cambridge series is incomplete and has been superseded by the Göttingen edition, the volumes are still quite valuable and, for the texts they cover, perhaps also much more accessible than the corresponding Göttingen volumes.

The Göttingen series is still very much in progress. But, at this point, if I’m not missing any volumes, it looks like the Göttingen series still lacks the Joshua, Judges, 1–2 Samuel, 1–2 Kings, and 1 Chronicles that the Larger Cambridge edition contains.