Field’s Edition of Origen’s Hexapla

Since 1875, Frederick Field’s edition of Origen’s Hexapla has been the standard reference for the work. A new edition is in preparation under the auspices of the Hexapla Project. But, for the present, Field’s work remains an invaluable resource. His two-volume edition is available via Internet Archive.

N.B.: The Internet Archive link in the Hexapla Project’s “Editions of the Hexaplaric Fragments” goes only to a page that provides only Field’s first volume, containing Genesis–Esther. The second volume, containing Job–Malachi, is available on a separate page.

On the Web (July 24, 2012)

On the web:

  • Tommy Wasserman notes a new iOS app for New Testament manuscripts.
  • E. K. McFall has the latest article in the Journal of Greco-Roman Christianity and Judaism: “Are Dionysos and Oedipus Name Variatnios for Satan and Antichrist?”
  • Dan Wallace recounts an experience of reading a manuscript that “doesn’t exist.”
  • Alin Suciu highlights Lorenzo Perrone’s lecture on recently-discovered texts of Origen’s homilies on the Psalms. For a selection of previous background posts, see here.

Origen on the Web (June 22, 2012)

On the web:

  • Jim Davila reports the discovery of some previously lost Greek homilies on the Psalms, potentially by Origen (1, 2).
  • Peter Williams provides a link to a set of images of the manuscript.
  • Roger Pearse comments on the press release and quotes Jerome’s catalogue of Origen’s writings.
  • Alin Suciu passes along a letter from Lorenzo Perrone, provides several updates on the discussion, and releases a guest post from Mark Bilby.
  • Dirk Jongkind comments on a textual variant in the text’s quotation of 1 Corinthians.