SBLHS student supplement and “ibid.”

According to SBL Handbook of Style, 2nd ed., §§1, 3, 4.3.6, supports the use of “ibid.” From those descriptions, conventions look to be the same as for the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed., §14.29.

As an easy (and free) reference for students, SBL also provides a Student Supplement to the SBLHS.  One of the courses I’ve been teaching has a comparatively heavier emphasis on getting to know the nuts-and-bolts of SBL style. And a keen-eyed student, pointed out that page 4 of the Student Supplement has consecutively numbered footnotes 78 and 79. Both notes are for the same source, but the second (note 79) does not use the “ibid.” notation.

SBLHSSpg4

The SBLHS blog now conveniently has a contact link for sending questions and comments to the SBL staff.So, I took this opportunity to try out this invitation. In response to my inquiry, the SBL staff kindly clarified and confirmed that the Student Supplement‘s reading is indeed an erratum. It should have “80” or “81” to replace the note number that currently reads “79” on page 4. Kudos to the SBL staff for taking the time to do so!

TC 21

The newest volume of TC has been released, containing eight book reviews and the following articles:

  • Gregory R. Lanier, “A Case for the Assimilation of Matthew 21:44 to the Lukan “Crushing Stone” (20:18), with Special Reference to 104”
  • Aron Pinker, “A New Attempt to Interpret Job 30:24”
  • Georg Gäbel, The Import of the Versions for the History of the Greek Text: Some Observations from the ECM of Acts
  • Katie Marcar, “The Quotations of Isaiah in 1 Peter: A Text-Critical Analysis”

HT: New Articles and Reviews in the TC Journal — Evangelical Textual Criticism

Journal of the Jesus Movement in its Jewish Setting

Access to the Journal of the Jesus Movement in its Jewish Setting is open and available online. JJMJS is:

a peer-reviewed academic open access journal, published electronically (immediate free online availability) in co-operation with Eisenbrauns, with support of McMaster University and Caspari Center….

 

The journal aims, uniquely, to advance scholarship on this crucial period in the early history of the Jewish and Christian traditions when they developed into what is today known as two world religions, mutually shaping one another as they did so. JJMJS publishes high-quality research on any topic that directly addresses or has implications for the understanding of the inter-relationship and interaction between the Jesus movement and other forms of Judaism, as well as for the processes that led to the formation of Judaism and Christianity as two related but independent religions.

 

The primary fields of study are: Christian Origins, New Testament studies, Early Jewish Studies (including Philo and Josephus), the Dead Sea Scrolls, Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha, Rabbinic Studies, Patristics, History of Ancient Christianity, Reception History, and Archaeology. Methodological diversity and innovation is encouraged.

HT: AWOL

SBL (e)mail badges and tickets

Apparently, name badges and tote bag tickets for this year’s SBL meeting will be distributed by email:

In an effort to cut down on lines for badge reprints at registration, name badges will no longer be sent via postal mail. Instead, check your e-mail in early November for a special link that will allow you to print your name badge and tote bag ticket to bring with you to San Antonio. If you bring these items to the Annual Meeting, you will not need to stand in line for registration.

 

When you arrive at the San Antonio Convention Center, you may use your tote bag ticket to pick up a tote bag at the Tote Bag Window, located in the main Lobby outside Exhibit Hall 1. Inside the tote bag will be your lanyard and your name badge holder, and you can slip in your name badge and enjoy the rest of the Annual Meeting!

I had apparently missed this announcement earlier. So, on realizing I didn’t have on hand the usual pre-conference envelope from SBL with these items, I began to wonder if I’d misplaced it and turned up the announcement. Kudos to SBL for this small bit of pre-meeting paperwork reduction and absent-minded professor loss prevention.