Justin’s Dialog with Trypho in Greek (redux)

Justin Martyr presents a book to the emperor, paper etching, print made by Jacques Callot, published by Israël Henriet, 1632–1635 [PD-1923]
To date, one of this site’s more popular posts has been this one about W. Trollope’s Greek edition of Justin Martyr’s Dialog with Trypho.

J.-P. Migne’s edition would, of course, be more standard. Justin’s Dialog is available in volume 6 of Migne’s Patrologia graeca, and that text has been made available online at:

A New (Very Old) KJV

On MSN:

The earliest known draft of the King James Bible, regarded as the most widely read work in English, has been unearthed among ancient papers lodged in a Cambridge college.

American scholar Jeffrey Miller announced his year-old discovery in the Times Literary Supplement this week, saying it would help fill in gaps in understanding how the bible, published in 1611, came to be.

. . .

Figuring Things Out

The latest issue of the Journal of Faith and the Academy is kindly carrying my article “Figuring Things Out: Lyrical Resourcement for Figural Readings of Biblical Literature in the Contemporary Academy.” The “lyrical” element in the essay is an attempt to think through some of how Nicholas of Lyra might provide a helpful rubric for understanding and pursuing responsibly figural readings of biblical literature within a contemporary, confessional academic context.

Connections can read this essay via my LinkedIn page under “Publications.”

In the Mail: Driver, Brevard Childs

Driver, "Brevard Childs"
Daniel Driver

In yesterday’s mail arrived Daniel Driver’s Brevard Childs, Biblical Theologian: For the Church’s One Bible (Baker). The volume is a corrected, North American edition of Driver’s previous volume under the same title from Mohr Siebeck (2010; ix), which was itself a “thorough revision and updating” of Driver’s PhD thesis (Brevard Childs: The Logic of Scripture’s Textual Authority in the Mystery of Christ, St. Andrews, 2008; xi). This North American edition was just released in August, and Baker’s description of it is as follows:

Brevard Childs (1923–2007), one of the monumental figures in biblical interpretation in the last half-century, is a founding presence in the current resurgence in theological interpretation of Scripture. He combined critique of biblical scholarship with a constructive proposal related to the canon. Because his work is influential, complex, and contested, it needs and merits clarification. In this full-scale explication of Childs’s thought, Daniel Driver takes account of the complete corpus of Childs’s work, providing a thorough introduction to the context, content, and reception of his canonical approach. . . . [T]his affordable North American paperback edition adds an appendix giving English translations of the numerous German extracts in the book.

For this volume, I am grateful to Baker and to the Stone-Campbell Journal, which has solicited a review.

Journal of Theological Studies 63, no. 2

The Journal of Theological Studies
The Journal of Theological Studies (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The latest issue of the Journal of Theological Studies includes:

  • Max Rogland, ” ‘Moses Used to Take a Tent’?: Reconsidering the Function and Significance of the Verb Forms in Exodus 33:7–11″
  • C. A. Strine, “The Role of Repentance in the Book of Ezekiel: A Second Chance for the Second Generation”
  • Benjamin Schliesser, ” ‘Abraham Did not “Doubt” in Unbelief’ (Rom. 4:20): Faith, Doubt, and Dispute in Paul’s Letter to the Romans”
  • Harry Tolley, “Clement of Alexandria’s Reference to Luke the Evangelist as Author of Jason and Papiscus
    Runar M. Thorsteinsson, “Justin and Stoic Cosmo-Theology”
  • Alison Bonner, “Was Patrick Influenced by the Teaching of Pelagius?”
  • Stephen Hampton, ” ‘Welcome Dear Feast of Lent’: Rival Understandings of The Forty-Day Fast in Early Stuart England”

Baur's Paul(us) on Google Books

Ferdinand Christian Baur.
F. C. Baur (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Google Books has available two full PDF copies (1, 2) of the original German of F. C. Baur’s Paulus, der Apostel Jesu Christi (1845). Also available are the first and second volumes of second edition of the English translation produced by Eduard Zeller (Paul, the Apostle of Jesus Christ, 2 vols., 1873–1875). In addition, the book’s second, posthumously produced German edition (2 vols., 1866–1867) from which Zeller translated the English version is available in a single, combined PDF that contains both of its volumes.