Calvin’s commentaries

John Calvin’s commentaries have been brought into varying English versions. The version published in Edinburgh by Calvin Translation Society, 1844–1856, is the version that has been reprinted by Baker Academic and Logos Bible Software.

Many of these volumes are openly available online. Below is a list with links to those that I’ve located thus far. Volumes not yet found are:

  • Psalms (vol. 1)
  • Isaiah (vol. 1)
  • Catholic Letters

Interested readers who may find these volumes are specially welcome to post links below to help complete the list.


Genesis (vol. 1, vol. 2)

A harmony of Exodus–Deuteronomy (vol. 1, vol. 2, vol. 3, vol. 4)

Joshua

Psalms (vol. 1, vol. 2, vol. 3, vol. 4, vol. 5)

Isaiah (vol. 1, vol. 2, vol. 3, vol. 4)

Jeremiah, Lamentations (vol. 1, vol. 2, vol. 3, vol. 4, vol. 5)

Ezekiel 1–20 (vol. 1, vol. 2)

Daniel (vol. 1, vol. 2)

Minor prophets (vol. 1, vol. 2, vol. 3, vol. 4, vol. 5)

A harmony of the Synoptics (vol. 1, vol. 2, vol. 3)

John (vol. 1, vol. 2)

Acts (vol. 1, vol. 2)

Romans

1–2 Corinthians (vol. 1, vol. 2)

Galatians, Ephesians

Philippians, Colossians, 1–2 Thessalonians

1–2 Timothy, Titus, Philemon

Hebrews

Catholic letters

Ad fontes @Logos

Graves, ed., "Biblical Interpretation in the Early Church" coverI’ve previously mentioned Michael Graves’s Biblical Interpretation in the Early Church (Fortress, 2017).  The text is part of a projected 8-volume series. Logos Bible Software now has the first four volumes available for order via their pre-publication program. This includes

  • Michael Graves, ed., Biblical Interpretation in the Early Church’
  • Maria E. Doerfler and George Kalantzis, eds., Church and Empire
  • Everett Ferguson and George Kalantzis, eds., Understandings of the Church
  • Helen Rhee and George Kalantzis, eds., Wealth and Poverty in Early Christianity

For more information about the half-series bundle or to order, see the Logos website.

Graves, ed., “Biblical interpretation in the early church”

Graves, ed., "Biblical Interpretation in the Early Church" coverAvailable in Fortress’s Ad fontes series is Biblical Interpretation in the Early Church, edited by Michael Graves. According to the volume’s blurb,

Biblical Interpretation in the Early Church is part of Ad Fontes: Early Christian Sources, a series designed to present ancient Christian texts essential to an understanding of Christian theology, ecclesiology, and practice. The books in the series will make the wealth of early Christian thought available to new generations of students of theology and provide a valuable resource for the Church. This volume focuses on how Scripture was interpreted and used for teaching by early Christian scholars and church leaders.

Developed in light of recent Patristic scholarship, Ad Fontes volumes will provide a representative sampling of theological contributions from both East and West. The series aims to provide volumes that are relevant for a variety of courses: from introduction to theology to classes on doctrine and the development of Christian thought. The goal of each volume is not to be exhaustive, but rather representative enough to denote for a non-specialist audience the multivalent character of early Christian thought, allowing readers to see how and why early Christian doctrine and practice developed the way it did.

Logos celebrates 25 years

Thank You for 25 Years from Logos Bible SoftwareTo celebrate the 25th anniversary of Logos Bible Software, Logos is giving users $25 of credit toward orders at Logos.com before 1 March. Originally, the offer had been limited to credit toward a select number of resources but has since been expanded to “any order on logos.com.”

Combined with academic pricing, the offer coupon code, and $0.34, I was able to load up on:

If you haven’t yet taken advantage of the offer,  be sure to take a look before it ends. While you’re at it, you can also add your birthday to your Faithlife account and typically find another $20 credit each year during your birthday month.

Justin’s Dialog with Trypho in Greek (redux)

Justin Martyr presents a book to the emperor, paper etching, print made by Jacques Callot, published by Israël Henriet, 1632–1635 [PD-1923]
To date, one of this site’s more popular posts has been this one about W. Trollope’s Greek edition of Justin Martyr’s Dialog with Trypho.

J.-P. Migne’s edition would, of course, be more standard. Justin’s Dialog is available in volume 6 of Migne’s Patrologia graeca, and that text has been made available online at:

A New (Very Old) KJV

On MSN:

The earliest known draft of the King James Bible, regarded as the most widely read work in English, has been unearthed among ancient papers lodged in a Cambridge college.

American scholar Jeffrey Miller announced his year-old discovery in the Times Literary Supplement this week, saying it would help fill in gaps in understanding how the bible, published in 1611, came to be.

. . .

Figuring Things Out

The latest issue of the Journal of Faith and the Academy is kindly carrying my article “Figuring Things Out: Lyrical Resourcement for Figural Readings of Biblical Literature in the Contemporary Academy.” The “lyrical” element in the essay is an attempt to think through some of how Nicholas of Lyra might provide a helpful rubric for understanding and pursuing responsibly figural readings of biblical literature within a contemporary, confessional academic context.

Connections can read this essay via my LinkedIn page under “Publications.”