TC 21

The newest volume of TC has been released, containing eight book reviews and the following articles:

  • Gregory R. Lanier, “A Case for the Assimilation of Matthew 21:44 to the Lukan “Crushing Stone” (20:18), with Special Reference to 104”
  • Aron Pinker, “A New Attempt to Interpret Job 30:24”
  • Georg Gäbel, The Import of the Versions for the History of the Greek Text: Some Observations from the ECM of Acts
  • Katie Marcar, “The Quotations of Isaiah in 1 Peter: A Text-Critical Analysis”

HT: New Articles and Reviews in the TC Journal — Evangelical Textual Criticism

Lightfoot, Works

English: John Lightfoot (1602-1675)
John Lightfoot (1602–1675; Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Rob Bradshaw has collected John Pitman’s 13-volume set of John Lightfoot’s works. Among other things, Lightfoot’s works include a series of “Hebrew and Talmudical Exercitations” on Matthew–1 Corinthians (i.e., discussions of texts in light of select Talmudic and other Jewish literary parallels). Via a convenient master table of contents page, the set is available in one PDF file per printed volume.

New Testament Studies 59, no. 3

New Testament Studies
New Testament Studies (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The latest issue of New Testament Studies includes:

  • Joel Marcus, “Passover and Last Supper Revisited”
  • Klaus B. Haacker, “Der Geist und das Reich im Lukanischen Werk: Konkurrenz oder Konvergenz zwischen Pneumatologie und Eschatologie?”
  • Anthony Le Donne, “The Improper Temple Offering of Ananias and Sapphira”
  • Richard Last, “The Election of Officers in the Corinthian Christ-Group”
  • Joel R. White, “‘Peace and Security’ (1 Thessalonians 5.3): Is It Really a Roman Slogan?”
  • Thomas R. Blanton, “The Benefactor’s Account-book: The Rhetoric of Gift Reciprocation according to Seneca and Paul”
  • David J. Downs, “Justification, Good Works, and Creation in Clement of Rome’s Appropriation of Romans 5–6”
  • James A. Kelhoffer, “Reciprocity as Salvation: Christ as Salvific Patron and the Corresponding ‘Payback’ Expected of Christ’s Earthly Clients according to the Second Letter of Clement”
  • Benjamin R. Wilson, “Taking up and Raising, Fixing and Loosing: A Chiastic Wordplay in Acts 2.23b–24”

Currents in Biblical Research 11, no. 3

The latest issue of Currents in Biblical Research includes the following:

  • Serge Frolov, “Sleeping with the Enemy: Recent Scholarship on Sexuality in the Book of Judges”
  • Jason Hood and Matthew Emerson, “Summaries of Israel’s Story: Reviewing a Compositional Category”
  • Coleman Baker, “Peter and Paul in Acts and the Construction of Early Christian Identity: A Review of Historical and Literary Approaches”
  • Bruce Worthington, “Alternative Perspectives beyond the Perspectives: A Summary of Pauline Studies that has Nothing to Do with Piper or Wright”
  • F. S. Naiden, “Recent Study of Greek Religion in the Archaic through Hellenistic Periods”

New Testament Studies 59, no. 1

New Testament Studies
New Testament Studies (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In addition to John Barclay’s tribute to Friedrich Avemarie, the latest issue of New Testament Studies includes:

  • Kelly R. Iverson, “Incongruity, Humor, and Mark: Performance and the Use of Laughter in the Second Gospel (Mark 8.14–21)”
  • Izaak J. de Hulster, “The Two Angels in John 20.12: An Egyptian Icon of Resurrection”
  • Isaac W. Oliver, “Simon Peter Meets Simon the Tanner: The Ritual Insignificance of Tanning in Ancient Judaism”
  • Andrzej Gieniusz, “‘Debtors to the Spirit’ in Romans 8.12?: Reasons for the Silence”
  • L. L. Welborn, “‘That There May Be Equality’: The Contexts and Consequences of a Pauline Ideal”
  • Sigurd Grindheim, “Not Salvation History, but Salvation Territory: The Main Subject Matter of Galatians”
  • Andreas Dettwiler, “La lettre aux Colossiens: une théologie de la mémoire”
  • Régis Burnet, “Pour une Wirkungsgeschichtedes lieux: l’exemple d’Haceldama”
  • Gyula Vattamány, “Kann das Salz verderben? Philologische Erwägungen zum Salz-Gleichnis Jesu”

Review of Biblical Literature Newsletter (October 31, 2012)

The latest reviews from the Review of Biblical Literature include:

New Testament and Cognate Studies

Second Temple Judaism

Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 55, no. 3

Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society
Image via Wikipedia

The Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 55, no. 3 includes:

  • David W. Chapman and Andreas Köstenberger, “Jewish Intertestamental and Early Rabbinic Literature: An Annotated Bibliographic Resource Updated (Part 2)
  • Abraham Kuruvilla, “The Aqedah (Genesis 22): What Is the Author Doing with What He Is Saying?”
  • Greg Goswell, “The Temple Theme in the Book of Daniel”
  • Charlie Trimm, “Did YHWH Condemn the Nations When He Elected Israel?: YHWH’s Disposition toward Non-Israelites in the Torah”
  • Steve Walton, “What Does ‘Mission’ in Acts Mean in Relation to the ‘Powers That Be’?”
  • Michael D. Fiorello, “The Ethical Implications of Holiness in James 2”

The Resurrection of the Son of God

In Acts 13:16–41, Paul addresses the Pisidian synagogue. In this discourse’s context, Paul asserts “we preach to you the good news concerning the promise that had come to the fathers—that this promise God has fulfilled for us their children by raising Jesus” (Acts 13:32–33; ἡμεῖς ὑμᾶς εὐαγγελιζόμεθα τὴν πρὸς τοὺς πατέρας ἐπαγγελίαν γενομένην, ὅτι ταύτην ὁ θεὸς ἐκπεπλήρωκεν τοῖς τέκνοις [αὐτῶν] ἡμῖν ἀναστήσας Ἰησοῦν). From here, the following quotation of Ps 2:7 confirms Jesus’ resurrection by Yahweh’s hand (cf. Acts 13:37).1 This resurrection in incorruption situates Jesus as the means by which the ancestral promise becomes actualized (Acts 13:34–37) because it situates him as the recipient and mediator of the things vouchsafed to David (Acts 13:34)—namely, an everlasting covenant in which the wandering return and receive forgiveness from Yahweh (Isa 55; cf. Deut 30).2


1. Chrysostom, Hom. Act., 29 (NPNF1, 11:182–85).

2. Ibid.; N. T. Wright, Jesus and the Victory of God (Christian Origins and the Question of God 2; Minneapolis: Fortress, 1996), 268–74, 576–77.