RBL Newsletter (November 30, 2009)

The latest reviews from the Review of Biblical Literature include the following:

New Testament and Cognate Studies

Jewish Scripture and Cognate Studies

Other Fields

This Year’s IBR Giveaway

At the Friday night meeting of the Institute for Biblical Research, there is traditionally a book giveaway of some kind. At my first IBR last year, attendees received M. Daniel Carroll R.’s Christians at the Border and either Theological Interpretation of the New Testament (ed. Kevin Vanhoozer, Daniel Treier, and N. T. Wright) or Theological Interpretation of the Old Testament (ed. Kevin Vanhoozer, Craig Bartholomew, and Daniel Treier).

The Theology of John's Gospel and Letters: The Word, the Christ, the Son of God At this year’s meeting, Zondervan kindly provided copies of Andreas Köstenberger’s recently released Theology of John’s Gospel and Letters: The Word, the Christ, the Son of God. According to the publisher’s description,

A Theology of John’s Gospel and Letters introduces the first volume in the BTNT series. Building on many years of research and study in Johannine literature, Andreas Köstenberger not only furnishes an exhaustive theology of John’s Gospel and letters, but also provides a detailed study of major themes and relates them to the Synoptic Gospels and other New Testament books. Readers will gain an in-depth and holistic grasp of Johannine theology in the larger context of the Bible.

As a whole, the forthcoming volumes of the Biblical Theology of the New Testament series will also

provide[] upper college and seminary-level textbooks for students of New Testament theology, interpretation, and exegesis. Pastors and discerning theology readers alike will also benefit from this series. Written at the highest level of academic excellence by recognized experts in the field, the BTNT series not only offers a comprehensive exploration of the theology of every book of the New Testament, including introductory issues and major themes, but also shows how each book relates to the broad picture of New Testament theology.

The authors for the forthcoming volumes on the other New Testament documents and corpora besides the Johannine Gospel and letters are as follows:

  • Michael Wilkins (Matthew)
  • David Garland (Mark)
  • Darrell Bock (Luke-Acts)
  • Douglas Moo (Paul)
  • George Guthrie (Hebrews)
  • Thomas Schreiner (Peter, James, and Jude)
  • Andreas Köstenberger and Alan Bandy (Revelation)

So, the series appears poised to provide several, helpful resources for students and teachers of the New Testament from a biblical-theological angle, and it will be interesting to see precisely how the future volumes come together.

Biblioblog Top 50 (November 2009)

Despite a self-enforced blogging hiatus to complete an ETS paper that was almost itself three things that were never satisfied and four that never said enough (cf. Prov 30:15b), New Testament Interpretation rose 17 spaces in November to slot 134 from the drop to 151 that it had seen the previous month at the front of the hiatus. Thanks to everyone for their interest even during the break. I trust this post will constitute a return to a more active NTI.

In this month’s listing, Jim West (of course?) takes the number one spot again for the eighth straight month. He does “prophetically” wonder whether the “music of the spheres” might just be understood as playing his tune, but I suppose we may need to wait another month for that.

RBL Newsletter (October 17, 2009)

The latest reviews from the Review of Biblical Literature include the following:

New Testament and Cognate Studies

Jewish Scripture and Cognate Studies

Maturing Scientific Communities

As young scientists routinely obtain, through education, their introduction into mature, scientific communities, young scientific communities may require some time to mature and develop their communities’ paradigms (Kuhn 11). During this early phase, nascent scientific communities typically involve different schools of thought that seek “relevant” facts somewhat individualistically according to whatever paradigms they find most influential from other areas of thought (Kuhn 15–17). Typically, one of these “pre-paradigm schools” will triumph over the others at some point and usher in a community’s paradigmatic period (Kuhn 17–18). The precise point of transition from nascent to mature scientific community is seldom easily identifiable, but neither is this transition completely obscured because of the notable advances achieved in the move from the pre-paradigm period into the paradigm period. Instead, a general, historical period can typically be identified in which this transition occurred for any given, mature field (cf. Kuhn 21–22).


In this post:

Thomas Kuhn
Thomas Kuhn

Journal of Biblical Literature 128.3

The fall issue of the Journal of Biblical Literature is due to be released shortly. This issue includes:

New Testament

Jewish Scriptures and Cognate Studies

Other Fields

Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 52.3

The fall issue of the Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society arrived in the mail yesterday and includes the following:

New Testament

  • Kevin W. McFadden, “The Fulfillment of the Law’s Dikaiōma: Another Look at Romans 8:1–4,” pgs. 483–97

Jewish Scriptures

  • Greg Goswell, “The Order of the Books in the Greek Old Testament,” pgs. 449–66
  • Chee-Chiew Lee, “גים in Genesis 35:11 and the Abrahamic Promise of Blessings for the Nations,” pgs. 467–82
  • Andrew S. Malone, “God the Illeist: Third-Person Self-References and Trinitarian Hints in the Old Testament,” pgs. 499–518

Systematic Theology

  • William Hasker, “Why Simple Foreknowledge Is Still Useless (in Spite of David Hunt and Alex Pruss),” pgs. 537–44
  • David P. Hunt, “Contra Hasker: Why Simple Foreknowledge Is Still Useful,” pgs. 545–50
  • Scott C. Warren, “Ability and Desire: Reframing Debates Surrounding Freedom and Responsibility,” pgs. 551–67
  • Mark Sweetnam and Crawford Gribben, “J. N. Darby and the Irish Origins of Dispensationalism,” pgs. 569–77

Other Fields

  • Timothy T. Larsen, “Literacy and Biblical Knowledge: The Victorian Age and Our Own,” pgs. 519–35