Walton, “Old Testament Theology for Christians”

Walton, "Old Testament Theology for Christians" coverDue out next month from InterVarsity Press is John Walton’s Old Testament Theology for Christians: From Ancient Context to Enduring Belief. According to the book’s blub,

Walton unfolds a grand panorama of Yahweh and the gods, of cosmos and humanity, of covenant and kingdom, of temple and torah, of sin and evil, and of salvation and afterlife. Viewed within its ancient Near Eastern cognitive environment, the text takes unexpected turns and blossoms into fresh and challenging insights. No matter how you are accustomed to viewing the first testament of the Bible, Old Testament Theology for Christians will challenge and sharpen your perceptions.

For additional information or to pre-order, see InterVarsity, Amazon, or other book sellers.

Tyndale GNT to Be Available for Free

Forthcoming from Crossway this November is the new Greek New Testament edition produced by Tyndale House. Print copies are currently available for pre-order at Crossway, Amazon, and elsewhere. Per the FAQs sheet on the text as well,

This text will be available digitally and will be free for many uses around the world, in accord with the joint desire of both Tyndale House and Crossway to serve the global church in an open-handed way with the very best Greek text possible.

For other discussion of the Tyndale edition, see Tyndale House GNT and TNT Updates.

Speeding up Logos on Windows

Recent updates to Logos Bible Software for Windows have included an additional feature to speed up the platform’s load time. Users with hard disk (rather than solid-state) drives will notice the biggest improvements. For the present, the feature requires a manual action after each software update, but there are plans to roll this action into the update process in the future to eliminate the additional step.

Instructions and details can be found in this forum thread. On a suggestion that I came across in one of the forums, I’ve created a batch file and then linked to that file from the Logos bookmarks bar to simplify reapplying the enhancement. So, in the batch file, I have:

“[%Path to Logos.exe%]\Logos.exe” /ngen
rem “[%Path to Logos.exe%]\Logos.exe” /unngen

The second line does nothing since it’s currently a remark (“rem”). But, moving the “rem” notation from the second line to the first line and then rerunning the batch file would remove the enhancement if ever that were needed.

Anchor Bible Discounts from Logos

This month, three Anchor Bible volumes are free or deeply discounted from Logos Bible software:

The Anchor Bible series is itself also on sale for 50% off. For those interested in purchasing the series, it seems the recommended method is to take advantage of the individual volume discounts for this month and then let dynamic pricing apply to the balance of the series in a separate order.

Scott, “Exile: A Conversation with N. T. Wright”

Scott, "Exile" coverThis summer,  InterVarsity Press released James M. Scott’s Exile: A Conversation with N. T. Wright. According to the book’s blub, Wright’s

signature contention, that Israel’s continuing exile was a pivotal issue in the emergence of Christianity, has found a central place in contemporary New Testament scholarship.

While many find this a compelling key to understanding the New Testament, critical responses also abound. This book engages a variety of scholars in conversation with Wright’s thesis. The scene is set in an introduction by James M. Scott, who has made significant contributions to the debate. Then, in a programmatic essay, Wright clearly restates his thesis. Next come eleven essays from scholars such as Walter Brueggemann, Philip Alexander, Jörn Kiefer, Dorothy Peters, and Scot McKnight. They interact with Wright’s thesis from various perspectives: Hebrew Bible, Septuagint, early Judaism, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the New Testament. Hans Boersma and Ephraim Radner then engage Wright’s thesis from theological perspectives. Finally, Wright offers a lively response to his interlocutors.

For additional information or to pre-order, see InterVarsity, Amazon, or other book sellers.

Didaktikos 1

https://didaktikosjournal.com/Faithlife has launched a new journal specifically for faculty, Didaktikos, which focuses on issues related to theological education. The primary editor is Douglas Estes, and the editorial board includes Karen Jobes, Randolph Richards, Beth Stovell, and Douglas Sweeney. The inaugural issue includes authors and topics of broad interest:

• Mark Noll talks about teaching with expertise and empathy.
• Craig Evans, Jennifer Powell McNutt, and Fred Sanders write about recent trends in biblical archaeology, church history, and theology (respectively).
• Grant Osborne shares wisdom from his 40-year teaching career.
• Craig Keener writes about writing.
• Jan Verbruggen covers some fascinating research into the earliest alphabet (and it’s not Phoenician).
• Joanne Jung has written a helpful article on how to write effective prompts for online discussions.
• Darrell Bock discusses an overlooked area of NT studies.
• Stephen Witmer, an adjunct at Gordon-Conwell, shares solid insights about the synergy between teaching and pastoring.

Interested faculty can find more information and subscribe on the Didaktikos website or the journal’s announcement on the Logos Academic Blog.

The Chicago and SBL Manuals

The Chicago Manual of Style (CMS) has been updated to its 17th edition (2017). According to the second edition of the SBL Handbook of Style (SBLHS),

Currently in its 16th edition, The Chicago Manual of Style remains the most comprehensive general authority on editorial style and publishing practices. Answers to questions not addressed in this handbook may be found there. (§3.3)

The reference to CMS’s “current” edition raises the possibility that a new CMS edition may occasion a change in the CMS edition best followed by users of SBLHS2. In addition, on noting the release of CMS17, SBL Press commented that

based on the Chicago Manual of Style, this new edition will no doubt prompt changes to our own style. We will announce relevant changes on this blog in the coming months.

This comment made it sound like changes might be affected in SBL style before the release of SBLHS3 simply based on the release of CMS17. On reaching out to the ever-helpful folks at SBL Press, they’ve confirmed that

Our deference to CMS in matters not explicitly covered in SBLHS2 or on the SBLHS2 blog automatically upgrades to the most current version of CMS. Thus, as of September 1, 2017, we now defer to CMS 17th ed.

For the balance of the SBL Press’s note about CMS17, see the SBL Press blog. For more information about CMS17 or to order a copy, see the University of Chicago Press, Amazon, or other booksellers.

TopTracker

TopTracker provides a straight-forward, free time tracking utility that works on both Windows and OS X. The utility allows commenting on each session tracked (e.g., words written during that session). It also allows export via CSV, from where numbers can be crunched further in Excel to see how well progress is going.

By default, TopTracker will upload screenshots periodically while it’s running, but this feature can be disabled and other elements customized in the program’s settings.

For other similar utilities, see the Zapier blog. For additional discussion of the value of tracking writing progress or other “deep work,” see Paul Silvia’s book How to Write a Lot or Cal Newport’s Deep Work.